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What is Platelet-Rich Plasma Hair Restoration?

Are you experiencing excessive hair loss?  Hair loss is a common complaint that can be frustrating to deal with, but fortunately, there are several treatment options available, including platelet-rich plasma therapy.  

What Is Platelet Rich Plasma?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is plasma enriched with a high concentration of platelets.   Platelets are blood cells that contain growth factors that accelerate healing and stimulate tissue regeneration. 

The activation of platelets plays a critical role in the body’s natural healing process.  As a result, PRP therapy has been widely used in orthopedic medicine to treat joint injuries and support wound healing.  

In recent years, PRP has also been used in hair restoration to address male/female pattern baldness.  PRP has been a gamechanger because it is a natural, non-surgical approach to treating hair loss.   

How PRP Therapy Works?

PRP therapy involves the use of platelets derived from the body’s own blood.  A small sample of blood is taken from the patient (usually from the arm), and then spun in a centrifuge to separate the PRP from the other contents of the blood.  

After being separated, the concentrated platelets are injected directly into the affected areas of the scalp.  When PRP is applied to the scalp, the natural growth factors stimulate dormant hair follicles and generate hair growth.

There is no downtime after PRP therapy so patients can resume normal activities the same day.

What Results Will You See?

Hair typically starts to grow within 1-3 months of PRP treatment, and there will be a noticeable improvement in the density of the hair.  Although the new hair growth should last a long time, follow-up treatments may be required to maintain the results. 

If you are experiencing hair loss and you’re interested in a natural way to regrow your hair, PRP therapy may be the solution for you. 

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